Center for Ethics and Humanities
in the Life Sciences

College of Human Medicine

 

 

Recorded Webinars

Karen Kelly-Blake photo Libby Bogdan-Lovis photo

Covert Costs of Racial and Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce

Over the past century US medical workforce demographics have shifted. Moving away from a white male dominated profession, there is a welcomed push towards increasing gender, ethnic, racial and linguistic representation. Commonly, that push is linked to notions of desirable doctor/patient identity matching - described here as “concordance.” That demographic shift is accompanied by policy initiatives and rhetoric shaping the professional futures of Native American, African American, and Latino underrepresented minority (URM) physicians. Do these policy initiatives carry social costs that inadvertently influence URM’s futures in the medical workforce? This analysis considers the nature of medical workforce policy strategies. Findings suggest that selectively placing service expectations not similarly placed on their non-minority physician colleagues along with unexamined assumptions of racial/ethnic concordance between patient and physician may place an undue burden on URMs.
Karen Kelly-Blake, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences and the Department of Medicine; Libby Bogdan-Lovis, MA, is the Assistant Director for the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University. Bogdan-Lovis and Kelly-Blake are co-leading a multi-institutional research project on Doctor-patient Race/Ethnic Concordance in the Medical Workforce. They are interested in unpacking the complexities surrounding underrepresented minority service to the underserved and how that service may distract those physicians from pursuing other medical professional opportunities.
Recorded January 18, 2017



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Trust and the Learning Health System

Data sharing on a large scale is integral to emerging national initiatives such as learning health systems and precision medicine. Realizing the vision of learning health systems, “in which knowledge generation is so embedded into the core of the practice of medicine that it is a natural outgrowth and product of the healthcare delivery process and leads to continual improvement in care” requires a “trust fabric” to integrate policy and practice in health care, public health, and research. However, as increased data sharing stretches the currently disjointed regulatory and policy environment, the texture and resilience of this trust fabric will be challenged in its capacity to protect the public and its vulnerable populations, and to assure data will be used in ways that reflect societal values. What will it take to trust the health system with all that information? This presentation examines these tensions and dynamics. Based on preliminary data from the clinic and the community, Dr. Platt discusses a proposed a framework for trust to guide decision-making for local, state, and national learning health systems.
Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Learning and Knowledge Systems in the Department of Learning Health Sciences at the University of Michigan Medical School.
Recorded November 9, 2016



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Ethics and Children with Differences in Sex Development and Gender Nonconformity

Society once considered children born with atypical genital anatomy to be freaks of nature. Until recently, doctors labeled these children “hermaphrodites” and urged early appearance-altering surgery. While times have changed, somewhat, medical interventions continue despite mounting evidence of long-term harms associated with both medical and surgical “treatment.” In the last few years, family, public, and medical attention has increasingly focused on children who feel trapped in the body of the “opposite” sex and wish to live as the other gender. Controversy continues about how often these feelings persist into adulthood and when to use medical interventions, such as hormone blocking to prevent full pubertal development, to support the gender nonconformity. When should society constrain clinicians from intervening in these contentious arenas?
Joel E. Frader, MD, MA, is a Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities at Northwestern University, and Medical Director of Bridges Pediatric Palliative Care Program at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.
Recorded September 28, 2016



 

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Choosing to Test: Dr. A. P. Satterthwaite and the First Birth Control Pill Clinical Trials in Humacao, Puerto Rico

How did Adaline Pendleton Satterthwaite, an obstetrician-gynecologist (OB-GYN) working at a Protestant mission hospital in Puerto Rico, become one of the key architects of the first birth control pill? In 1952, Satterthwaite left the continental United States and went to Puerto Rico to work as an OB-GYN at Ryder Memorial Hospital in Humacao. She continued her work there through the early 1960s, but in 1957 she took on an additional job as Director of Family Planning Clinic and Research in Contraceptive Methods. In this capacity, Satterthwaite oversaw clinical trials of G.D. Searle & Co.’s Enovid, the first Food and Drug Administration approved oral contraceptive. This talk examines Satterthwaite’s personal and professional reasons for bringing the trials to Humacao, Puerto Rico and demonstrate her central, if understudied, role in the development of Enovid.
Kathryn Lankford is a Doctoral Student in the Department of History at Michigan State University.
Recorded October 19, 2016



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Re-envisioning shared decision making in primary care

Shared decision making is increasingly advocated as the best approach to patient care for many if not most medical decisions. Yet, actually implementing shared decision making in the primary care setting has remained vexingly elusive. This talk will explore the following questions: Can shared decision making include a primary care provider’s recommendation? If so, how can care recommendations be tailored to be more patient-centered?
Tanner J. Caverly, MD, MPH, is a Clinical Lecturer in the University of Michigan Medical School and Research Scientist at the VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.
Recorded April 13, 2016

 

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